Girl Education India Essays About Love

Education is an essential part of a living being, whether it’s a boy or a girl. Education helps an individual to be smarter, to learn new things and to know about the facts of the world. Education plays one of the most important roles in Women Empowerment. It also helps to put a stop to discrimination based on gender. Education is the first step to give women the power to choose the way of life she wants to lead.

Education helps women to be more productive in her work. A knowledgeable woman has the skills, information, talent, and self-confidence that she requires to be a superior mother, employee, and resident. Women constitute almost half the population of our country. Men and Women are like two sides of the coin and need identical opportunity to contribute to the country’s development. One cannot survive without the other. Here are essays of varying lengths on Girl Education to help you with the topic in your exam. You can select any Girl Education essay according to your need:

Essay on Girl Education

Girl Education Essay 1 (200 words)

Girl Education in India is largely essential for the growth of the nation because girls can do most of the things better than the boys. Nowadays girl education is necessary and is also compulsory because girls are the future of the country. In India, girl’s education is necessary as to develop socially and economically. Educated women yield a positive impact on Indian society through their contribution in professional fields like – medical, defence services, science and technology. They do good business and are also well-versed in handling their home and office. An improved economy and society are the outcome of girl’s education. Educated women can also help in controlling the population of the country by marrying at the right or later age in comparison to the uneducated women.

Women education in early Indian society was quite good but in the middle age, it was not because of numerous limitations towards women. However, again it is getting improved and better day by day as people in India have understood the fact that without the growth and development of women, the growth of the country is not possible. It is very true that equivalent expansion of both sexes will boost the economic and social growth in every area of the country.


 

Girl Education Essay 2 (300 words)

Girl Education was never considered necessary in the previous time. But over the period of time people have realized the importance of a girl’s education. It is now considered as the awakening of girls in the modern era. Women are now competing with men in all the spheres of life. But still, there are people who oppose girl’s education because they believe that a girl’s sphere is at home and also they think that it is wastage of money to spend on a girl’s education. This thought is wrong as girl education can bring an uprising in the culture.

Importance of Girl Education

There are a lot of advantages involved in the education of girls. A well-educated and grown up girl can play an important role in the development of the country. An educated girl can share the load and burden of the men in different fields. A well-educated girl if not forced to marry in her early age, can serve as writer, teacher, advocate, doctor, and scientist. She can perform very well in other important fields too.

Education is a boon for girls in this age of economic crises. In today’s time, it is really difficult to meet both the ends in a middle-class family. After the marriage, an educated girl can work and help her husband in bearing the expenses of the family. She can also earn if in case her husband expires and there is no helping hand in the family.

Education also broadens the thought of the women, thus it helps in the good upbringing of her children. It also gives her the freedom of thought to decide what best is there for her and the family.

Education helps a girl become economically independent while she knows her rights and women empowerment which helps her to fight against the problem of gender inequality.

Conclusion

The improvement of a nation depends on girl’s learning. So, girl’s education should be encouraged.

 

Girl Education Essay 3 (400 words)

Women education is essential for the appropriate social and economic development of the country. Both men and women run parallel like two wheels in every society. Hence, both are significant components of growth and development in the country. Thus, both require equal opportunity when it comes to education.

Advantages of Women Education in India

Girl education in India is required for the future of the country as women are the primary teachers of their kids who are the future of the nation. Uneducated women cannot dynamically contribute in managing the family and take proper care of the children and thus result in a weak future generation. There are numerous advantages of girl education. Some of the top ones are mentioned as under:

  • Educated women are more able to influence their future.
  • Educated women are able to reduce poverty by working and being economically strong.
  • Educated women have Low risk of child mortality.
  • Educated women are 50% more likely to have their child immunized.
  • Educated women are less likely to be taken advantage of and less likely to contact HIV/AIDS.
  • Educated women are less likely to become victims of domestic or sexual abuse.
  • Educated women reduce corruption and change the conditions that lead to terrorism.
  • Educated women are better operational to contribute to the family earnings.
  • Educated women are healthier and tend to have greater self-esteem and self-confidence.
  • Educated women help contribute and prosper their community.
  • Women who are educated see the potential and need to promote education in others.

Educated women can, without doubt, handle her family more efficiently. She can make each family associate accountable by imparting good qualities in children. She can take part in the social workings and this can be a great contribution towards the socioeconomic healthy nation.

By educating a man, only a part of the nation would be educated however by educating a woman, the whole country can be educated. Lack of women education weakens the potent part of the society. So, women should have full rights for the education and should not be treated inferior to men.

Conclusion:

India is now a leading country on the basis of women education. Indian History is not devoid of talented women. It is full of women philosophers like Gargi, Viswabara and Maitreya. Other renowned women include Mirabai, Durgabati, Ahalyabi and Laxmibai. All the legendary and historical women in India are an inspiration and motivation for today’s women. We can never overlook their contributions to the society and country.

Girl Education Essay 4 (500 words)

Female education is the need of the hour. We can’t become a developed nation without educating the women of the country. Women play an essential role in the all round progress of the country. Women must be educated to make a democracy successful. They are the real builders of a happy home.

By educating a man, we educate one person, but if we educate a woman, we educate the whole family. This highlights the significance of female education. It is true that a woman is the first teacher for her children and they receive their very first lesson in mother’s lap. Hence, if a mother is well-educated then she can play an important role in shaping her children’s future.

Educated Girls Vs Uneducated Girls

If we look at it, we will observe that a knowledgeable girl not only serve for her family but also serve for her nation. She can serve her nation as a teacher, a nurse, a doctor, an administrator, a soldier, a policewoman, a reporter, an athlete, etc.

It is a fact that the girls have gained more achievements than the boys in less time.

An educated wife can split the load of her husband’s life by doing jobs or by sharing her knowledgeable views about the jobs. An educated housewife can educate her children and can teach her children about the rights and moral values. She can also guide them to differentiate between good and bad things.

Girls are gaining their rights and respect in the society and our society is working hard for this. Girls have the potential to lead their country in every field.

Once Napoleon said – “Nation’s progress is impossible without trained and educated mothers and if the women of my country are not educated, about half of the people will be ignorant.” Thus we should create an atmosphere in which not a single woman remains uneducated.

Duties of a Girl and Contribution of Education

There are three major roles which are performed by women in her course of life – A daughter, a wife and a mother. Except for these significant duties, they have to establish themselves as good citizens of a nation. Hence, it is essential to give women a diverse kind of education from the one given to boys. Their learning should be in such a way that it should enable them to do their duties in an appropriate way. By education, they become fully mature in all the fields of life. An educated woman is well aware of her duties and rights. She can contribute to the development of the country in the same way as men do.

Conclusion

Women should be given equivalent chance in education like men and they should not be cut off from any development opportunities. To extend the significance and progress the level of women education all over the country, proper awareness programs are necessary, especially in the rural areas. A knowledgeable female can teach her whole family and also the whole country.


 

Girl Education Essay 5 (600 words)

In terms of inhabitants, India is the second largest nation in the world and the rate of female education is much low in India. Girl education was the subject of worry in India in the middle age though it has now been solved to an immense extent. Education to women has been given a lot of priority in India just like men to carry some encouraging changes in the community. Previously women were not permitted to exit the gate of their houses. They were only restricted to the household works.

Upliftment of Girl Education

The Upliftment of girl education was mainly done by Raja Ram Mohan Ray and Iswara Chandra Vidyasagar during the British rule in India. They paid attention towards women education. Also, there were some leaders like Jyotiba Phule & Baba Sahib Ambedkar from lower caste community who took various initiatives to make education available to the women of India. It was with their efforts that after the Independence the government also adopted various measures to provide education to women. As a result, the women’s literacy rate has grown up since 1947.

Despite the fact that many more women are getting educated and women are being literate nowadays, there is still a gap between the literacy rate of men and women. If we look closer towards the women literacy rate, the situation looks very discouraging. According to a survey only 60% of girls receive primary education and further, it lowers down drastically to 6% when it comes to high secondary education.

Factors Responsible for Low Rate of Girl Education

There are some factors which are responsible in our Indian society which restrict the girls to attend school. These are:

  • Poverty
  • Distance
  • Parents negative attitude
  • Insufficient school infrastructure
  • Religious factor
  • Child marriage
  • Child labour

Poverty – Though education is free still there is a lot of cost involved in sending children to school. It includes the cost of uniform, stationery, books, and conveyance which is too much for a family living below poverty line. They can’t even afford a day’s meal, educational expenses are too far to incur. That is the reason why parents prefer to keep their girl child at home.

Distance – In many parts of India, a primary school is situated too far away from the villages. There is 4-5 hours long walk to reach the school. Keeping in mind the safety and other security factors parents restrict the girl child to go to school.

Insecurity – Girls sometimes have to face various forms of violence at the school. Including violence on the way to school, by the school teacher, students and other people involved in the school environment. So girls’ parents think that she might not be safe at that place hence forbid them from going to school.

Negative Attitude – People generally think that a girl should learn how to cook, how to maintain the house and to do household tasks as these should be the primary focus of girl’s life. Their contribution to the household work is valued more than their education.

Child Marriage – In Indian society, still there are cases of child marriage. A girl is forced to marry at an early age and is often pulled out of the school at a very early age. Due to early marriage, they get pregnant at an early age and thus all their time is devoted towards the child and no time is left for studying.

Child Labour – This is also a major cause to forbid girls from studying. Working and earning at an early age is the main factor to be held responsible for not studying. Parents due to poverty force girls to work at an early age hence the girls are forbidden from studying.

Religious factor – India is a vast country and consists of various religions. Some religious practitioners also forbid the girl child to be educated. According to them, it is against the religion.

Conclusion

There is an immense need of educating the parents about the merits and benefits of girl child education. It’s not only the duty of the government but it’s our responsibility also to educate people around us. The best thing is that our P.M. has taken a very good initiative towards the girl child education through ‘Beti Bachao Beti Padhao’ campaign in villages. As per him, if we want to see our country developed then we have to make all girls educated.

 

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Meena (not her real name) didn't tell her parents when the older boys started harassing her on the hour-long walk to school from her home in Madanpur Khadar, south Delhi – grabbing her hand and shouting "kiss me" – because she knew she would get the blame, as if she had somehow encouraged them. She was right: when her family found out, they banned her from going back to school, worried about the effect on their "honour" if she was sexually assaulted. The plan now is to get her married. She is 16.

Gulafsha is luckier: her mother is determined she will become a doctor. But there are 70 pupils in a class at her school, and the teachers often simply don't turn up. The drinking water tanks are so filthy the pupils bring their own water. "I have never gone to a toilet at school in all these years, they are so bad," the 14-year-old says. She doesn't know how, but somehow her mother saves 900 rupees a month to pay for private tuition in three subjects.

Sumen, 35, is battling for her child's future, too. Her nine-year-old son has learning disabilities and she has tried and failed to get him into school every year since he was old enough. Finally, the authorities have agreed he should get some education, but it's only for one day a week. Sumen, a domestic help who never went to school herself, wonders if she should have tried to teach him at home: "But if I haven't studied, how much could I do for him?"

Four years ago, the World Bank upgraded India from a "poor" country to a middle-income one. As commentators were at pains to point out in November, when the UK announced it would end aid to India from 2015, the country has a space programme, 48 billionaires and its own aid budget. Under its Right to Education (RTE) Act, passed in 2009, a free and compulsory education is guaranteed for all children aged between six and 14, and the most recent figures for primary school enrolment stand at an impressive-sounding 98%.

But going to school, as those monitoring progress on the millennium development goal of achieving universal primary education have increasingly realised, is one thing: the quality of the education you get is another. Within government schools pupils face numerous challenges, says Oxfam India's Anjela Taneja. Overcrowded classrooms, absent teachers and unsanitary conditions are common complaints, and can lead parents to decide it is not worth their child going to school.

A 2010 report by the National Council for Teacher Education estimated that an additional 1.2 million teachers were needed to fulfil the RTE Act requirements, and last year the RTE Forum, a civil society collective of around 10,000 non-governmental organisations (NGOs), found that only 5% of government schools complied with all the basic standards for infrastructure set by the act. Some 40% of primaries had more than 30 students per classroom, and 60% didn't have electricity. The RTE Forum also reported official figures showing that 21% of teachers weren't professionally trained.

Earlier this year, the independent Annual Status of Education Report into rural schools found declining levels of achievement, with more than half of children in standard five – aged around 10 – unable to read a standard two-level text. "If you want to end child labour, you have to fix the education system," Taneja says. "People are aware of what education is and what it is not."

Nor do enrolment figures necessarily reflect who is actually attending school, she says. The number of primary age children not in school in India was put at 2.3 million in 2008, but other estimates suggest it could be as high as 8 million. According to an Indian government report, the primary drop-out rate in 2009 was 25%.

It is girls, and marginalised groups such as the very poor and the disabled, who are often left behind. While girls attend primary school in roughly equal numbers to boys, the gap widens as they get older and more are forced to drop out to help with work at home or get married.

Of the out-of-school children in 2008, 62% were girls; they make up two-thirds of illiterate 15- to 24-year-olds. And two-thirds of those not in school were from those lowest in the caste system, tribal groups and Muslim communities, despite those historically oppressed groups making up only 43% of India's children. Meanwhile, neighbourhood "low-budget" private schools serving low-income families desperate – like Gulafsha's mother – to provide their children with a "quality" education have mushroomed. But they are unregulated, and can lack trained teachers and proper infrastructure, says Taneja.

Madanpur Khadar, a "resettlement colony" begun in 2000 to house families moved on from newly cleared slums, has 145,000 residents. But the number of plots given out for homes is only really enough to accommodate around 60,000 to 70,000 people, explains Alok Thakur of Efrah (Empowerment for Rehabilitation, Academic & Health), a grassroots organisation working to promote socio-economic development in some of Delhi's poorest areas.

The buildings are made of brick, but 90% of households have no toilets, Thakur says. The sewers running along the edges of the bumpy, often unmade streets are only partially covered. Here and there great piles of glistening, treacle-dark sludge have apparently been dredged out. Animals root through heaps of rotting rubbish, and one large open space has become a shallow lake of foul-smelling filth. Pigs snuffle at the detritus littering its margins.

Kamlesh's hands quiver as she reads her testimony, the microphone bouncing her words off the surrounding buildings. Efrah has organised a "jan sunvai", or public hearing, giving residents the chance to air their grievances about the colony to a panel of experts, and the 35-year-old mother is speaking on education. At the area's three primary schools, the students number 2,176, 1,148 and 1,311, her submission says. They have 33, 14 and 20 teachers respectively. The quality and quantity of teaching is insufficient.

Inside one of the schools, some of the gloomy, bare-walled classrooms have low benches and desks. In others, the little girls sit on the floor, books in their laps. In several, no teacher is present; one man appears to be responsible for three of the small rooms. When the heavy metal gates at the entrance are opened at the end of the school day, an incredible crush of children pours into the squelchy mud of the lane outside.

Back at the hearing, the kind of street harassment suffered by Meena – sometimes referred to as "Eve-teasing" – and its effect on girls' education is another major concern. The brutal gang rape and murder of a Delhi student in December sparked protests across the country calling for changes in cultural attitudes and policing, but young women here say they feel scared by the way some men behave. "We complain to the police and [they] stand where they are and watch the girls being teased," Meenakshi, 18, tells the audience.

A series of measures have been brought in since the December attack aimed at making women safer, but despite these, there has been a spate of attacks on women in Delhi since the beginning of March, including four reported assaults on girls under 18. Only a fraction of such attacks are reported.

The Global Campaign for Education (GCE), a coalition of 26 NGOs and teaching unions, wants all nations to allocate at least 6% of GDP to education. India has been promising that since 1968, Taneja says, but the figure has never topped 4%, and it is currently 3.7%. It is an issue of political will, rather than a lack of cash, she suggests: education is not a vote-winning issue in a system of frequent elections, where pledges need to be deliverable immediately.

Nor do policymakers have a personal stake: the political classes don't tend to send their children to government schools. "It seems to me we can afford everything else," Taneja notes.

As the 2015 deadline for the millennium goal on primary education looms, the experiences of girls and women such as Meena, Gulafsha and Sumen have a particular resonance. On current trends, a Unesco-commissioned report concluded in October, the goal will be missed "by a large margin".

Progress was initially rapid, but has stalled since 2008, and 61 million children remain out of education. But as thoughts turn to replacement goals, attention is focusing not just on how to reach the remaining children, but on those who are now going to school but simply aren't learning, says Save the Children's Will Paxton, who leads on policy for the GCE UK. "The scale of the issue is pretty enormous," he says. "Not least because if they don't learn anything they disengage and drop out."

Targets to tackle inequality in who gets to go to school, and to push nations to help the most marginalised young people in education, will be another GCE focus. "Our argument is that the existing MDG doesn't really do enough to provide a strong incentive to worry about the hard-to-reach groups," Paxton says.

Meena, who comes from a Dalit family – the caste formerly known as "untouchables"– had imagined herself working for the police, or becoming a teacher. "My parents are looking for a boy for me," she says. "They say I can get married and then I can study. But I know that once I get married, it will become very difficult. My dream will never come true."

Some names have been changed

• Rachel Williams's trip was funded by the Global Campaign for Education UK and the National Union of Teachers

What we learned in Delhi, by Millie and Sam

Since returning from Delhi, Millie Wells has thought about girls like Meena a lot. "I was just walking to school and thinking how different my life is from hers," she says. "It's really hard to comprehend."

Millie, 15, from Ringwood school in Hampshire, and fellow pupil Sam Whittingham, 14, won the Steve Sinnott award to become 2013's young ambassadors for the Send My Friend to School campaign.

They travelled to Delhi to find out what stops children getting a good education, and now, armed with compelling first-hand accounts, will encourage other young people to lobby UK politicians on pushing for universal primary education.

Sam was impressed by the differences being made to children's lives by the projects he saw. "They knew they couldn't change everything in one go, but they helped small groups to chip away at the problem," he says.

The public hearing in Madanpur Khadar sticks in Millie's mind. "The people spoke with so much passion," she remembers. "They were trying to cope with what they had and campaign within their own community. It was amazing."

For free Send My Friend to School 2013 school packs and resources go to sendmy friend.org

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